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What GUNS Readers Are Saying

End Hunting.

I applaud Mr. Ciccone’s opinion on “harvesting.” Originally, humans were classified as “Hunter Gatherers,” I have a hard time understanding how killing a wild animal with a high-powered, scoped rifle at 200 or 300 yards is hunting. My 10-year-old son could do it. I subscribe to several firearm publications and a months total of animals killed for the simple sport of it is staggering. The movie Last of the Mohicans starts with the main characters running through the woods with single-shot muzzleloaders. This is what hunting is supposed to be about. And they were doing it for food, not for the thrill of getting another head to hang on the wall.

We did it to the buffalo, and now we are doing it to the rest of the world, i.e. Africa, Alaska, the western mountain areas. If so-called wild animals are allegedly causing the damage you claim, let it be handled the way is once was, by the locals sustaining the damage. From what I’ve been reading, the only damage being done in Africa is by tusk poachers, and I’ve yet to read about the severe crop damage caused by moose, polar bears or the elk shown page 40 in your October issue. I see the heads being hauled out of the mountains on horseback but where is the rest of the animal? Did the he-men on page 49 really need all the meat from the four dead elk? If these macho “hunters” want to prove their manliness, they should visit a local range and compete against real shooting marksmen and leave the world’s wildlife alone, before they are eventually gone.
Jim Schneider
Kentwood, Mich.
Member, Marine Corps Distinguished Shooters Assn.

Hog Damage

I just read Jerry Cicccone’s letter to the editor. He is rooting for hogs. Let me tell him why we feel like we do about hogs. My neighbor’s cornfield looked great ’til he started to harvest it. The outside rows were perfect, the inside ones, out of sight, were all trampled and the corn ears had been eaten. Then there are the ground nesting birds we used to have. The hogs will eat any nest they come across. How about fawns? During our ongoing dry conditions, fawns have fewer places to hide and are eaten by hogs. Equipment and vehicles suffer from the rough ground hogs tear up. Calves? When you find a head minus the ears and everything else, you know the hogs have found it and eaten everything they could. Calves are worth $600 to $1,500. How many of those to do think it takes to ruin your calf crop? Why do we do anything possible to eradicate them? They cause untold property and money loss. Here in Texas, the experts say we must remove 70 percent of the hogs each year by any means possible or we are loosing ground. It is possible depending on when they start a sow can have 2 or 3 litters a year. If you put all this into prospective, we are in a loosing battle.
Truett Bell
Pattison, Texas

Winner!

I would like to write this letter to the subscribers who enter the Gun of the Month giveaways via postcards. I have sent a postcard every month to the giveaway for years and I finally did win the Gun of the Month April 2013 package! The giveaway is legitimate so just be patient; maybe it’s your turn next month. Keep sending those postcards because it is not a waste of time.

Terry
Illinios via snail mail

Thanks Terry! As a reminder, we never publish the names of winners.—Jeff John

GUNS Magazine® welcomes letters to the editor. We reserve the right to edit all published letters for clarity and length. Due to the volume of mail, we are unable to individually answer your letters or e-mail. In sending a letter to GUNS Magazine, you agree to provide Publisher’s Development Corp. such copyright as is required for publishing and redistributing the contents of your letter in any format. Send your letters to Crossfire, GUNS Magazine, 12345 World Trade Dr., San Diego, CA 92128; e-mail: ed@gunsmagazine.com

Email Jeff at the address above, or leave a message in the comment section of this page. All comments can take up to 24 hours before they will be posted. We have the right to edit all comments.

All letters above published in The December 2013 Issue Of GUNS Magazine.


Page Turner:

I’ve never written to any gun magazines I subscribe to, but I couldn’t wait another issue to drop you a quick line.

I don’t know if others have written in the past about this, but no where else do I find the absolutely refreshing practice of actually finishing a story on contiguous pages but here in GUNS Magazine. I can’t describe the frustration I have flipping around in the other mags trying to finish every article, all the while trying to hold my place to get back to begin the next one. Thank you for this simple act of sanity; it alone would cement my future renewals but the quality of content certainly helps.
A happy reader in MA
(Yes, there really are some pro-gun people in this state!)

Last Hunt

John Taffin’s article “The Last Hunt,” was like getting hit on the head with a hammer. I lived every minute of it, being in the twilight of life at 79 years old, I can identify with his feelings. Within the past few years I’ve had to give up shooting the national match course, trap shooting, walking the pheasant fields and my beloved golf. Spinal stenosis and arthritis have taken their toll on my body. I remember my last round of golf, the last time I tried to shoot the national match course unable to get into the prone position and see the sights on my Garand, and my last pheasant hunt. Two Thanksgivings ago was my last 100 bird-trap shoot, just managing to finish the last 25 as my neck pained me so much. I can still shoot my handguns with my grandsons and go on a groundhog hunt if I can shoot from the car. Funny he mentioned the first time he shot a gun. I shot my first gun before kindergarten and before many of the other firsts in life, as have my children. I don’t have his trophies but I have had a lot of fun to look back on.
John Behre
Flemington, N.J.

More .30 Carbine Handguns

OK, I refrained from commenting on this’n before, as I never figgered anyone else cared, nor remembered, but since there’s been such a response, am I the only one who recollects the Universal Enforcer? It was a “cut-down” barreled M1 Carbine action with a pistol grip made from ’64 to ’83 by the Florida firm that started out “recycling” USGI surplus parts and later lost the good reputation they’d earned when they went to aftermarket/cast components. Iver Johnson later resurrected the Model after they acquired Universal. Granted, it barely qualifies as a “handgun” more of a “hand-rifle” or “handful!”
Peter M. Cromwell
Reading, Mich.

Bersa Fan

I subscribe to three or four gun magazines, but reading yours was the first time I have seen an article on the Bersa. I do not know why there are not more articles on this fabulous weapon. Perhaps it is lack of promotion by the company. I have spoken with other shooters who have not even heard of Bersa. I acquired a Bersa Thunder .380 and fell in love. It’s as smooth as the best brandy. Many of the qualities mentioned in the article about the Bersa .40 are true of the .380, which is my favorite weapon, especially for concealed carry. Never a problem.
Tom P.
Phoenix, Ariz.


GUNS Magazine® welcomes letters to the editor. We reserve the right to edit all published letters for clarity and length. Due to the volume of mail, we are unable to individually answer your letters or e-mail. In sending a letter to GUNS Magazine, you agree to provide Publisher’s Development Corp. such copyright as is required for publishing and redistributing the contents of your letter in any format. Send your letters to Crossfire, GUNS Magazine, 12345 World Trade Dr., San Diego, CA 92128; e-mail: ed@gunsmagazine.com

Email Jeff at the address above, or leave a message in the comment section of this page. All comments can take up to 24 hours before they will be posted. We have the right to edit all comments.

All letters above published in The November 2013 Issue Of GUNS Magazine.

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