Category Archives: Crossfire

Wheelweights

I don’t recall ever seeing an article on cast bullets that references automobile wheelweights as a cheap source of alloy for casting. I know the composition is not “pure” since the weights have various compositions. However, I have used wheelweights for over 50 years and they shoot just fine. I have a Lee Hardness Tester for measuring the hardness.
With the expense and scarcity of “pure” metals, this is a fine alternative to expensive cast bullets since the weights can be scrounged for free—usually. This resource should not be overlooked.
Charles LaPiene
Granby, Ma.

Mea Culpa
I was reading Payton Miller’s recent report on new and interesting products at the SHOT Show in the June issue. One of the products mentioned was the new SIG striker-fired pistol, but it was listed as the P250. The new striker-fired pistol is the SIG P320; the P250 has been out for some time and is a bobbed hammer DAO pistol.

As always we are big fans of your publications, and they are some of the few we have around in our office!
Joe Diaz

Southeast Iowa Firearms Training

My apologies. At the time I was suffering from an acute case of “model designation overload.” The SIG P320 represents the company’s first striker-fired DAO. And no, I can’t blame Las Vegas for the lapse. I was in bed by 8:00 the night before…room service chicken soup and an old Western on TV. Would that it were otherwise! —PM
2nd On Competition.

I would like to second the suggestion by reader Meyer Weiner in the June issue. I would be very interested in the firearms utilized in myriad international shooting competitions, be they rimfire, centerfire, pistol, long gun, rifle, or shotgun. I would be especially interested in the specialized target shotguns utilized in international trap, skeet, bunker trap, helice, and sporting clays. I believe it would provide for very interesting and educational reading. While GUNS does a fine job, shotguns often come in a weak third to pistols/rifles.
K. N. Koch
via e-mail

GUNS is pleased to announce Shari LeGate will start a column in the November issue dedicated to the guns and gear used in the wide field of shooting games. A champion skeet shooter, Shari was a member of the US National Team for 12 years, winning numerous titles and medals. —Jeff John
THREE Favorites

I purchased my first GUNS Magazine in, I believe, 1954 and have been a regular reader since. I want to commend several of your current writers and let you know these are the reasons I continue to subscribe.

I was very pleased when John Barsness joined your writing staff. His insightful, understandable writing on the technical side of firearms and handloading helps me enjoy the activity even more.

I very much enjoy Mike Venturino’s articles and columns as well. I especially enjoy his interests in 20th century military firearms (a passion I also share).
Finally, I want to acknowledge an ever-appreciating enjoyment of John Sheehan’s articles. He combines a detailed interest in firearms with the historical aspects of their development and application.

While I do enjoy reading all your writers, I want to commend these three in particular. You continue with the excellent writing and I’ll continue to subscribe—thanks.
Denis Symes
Vienna, Va.

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Vietnam Sniper

In the caption in Handloading from the May issue John Barsness cites Chuck Mawhinney (USMC) as having the “highest number of confirmed kills in Vietnam.” Actually the highest number of confirmed kills in Vietnam is Adelbert F. Waldron with 109 confirmed. But then, he was in the US Army, so maybe it doesn’t count. Just saying. Otherwise the article is great and as an M14 driver concur the .308 is truly a great round.
R. T. Langan
via e-mail

I should have specified Mawhinney as the Marine with the highest number of confirmed kills. I had heard about Waldron, though it’s been awhile. (Apparently age is catching up to me!) —John Barsness

Yang Kyoungjong

Appreciate John Connor’s “Forgotten or Unknown” piece this month and wanted to share an additional resource for each of two of the four men profiled for those who want to take a deeper dive:

The story of Yang Kyoungjong, the Korean taken prisoner with the Germans at Normandy and how he got there is also an entertaining movie entitled My Way (available on Netflix). According to the movie, Yang was the top marathon runner in Korea before the war, so his WWII story has several parallels with American Louie Zamperini (Unbroken).

Regarding the amazing story of 80-year-old Samuel Whitmore’s stand at Lexington and Concord and his incredible recovery after being left for dead is also just one of many inspirational stories of ordinary citizens taking a stand on April 19, 1775, told in vivid, page-turning detail in David Hackett Fischer’s book Paul Revere’s Ride.
Steve Beddor
Minneapolis, MN

Thanks for the tip on Paul Revere’s Ride, Steve, I’ll check it out. As for the movie My Way, I can highly recommend it as a well-made, interesting film very loosely based on Yang’s story. The producers took many liberties, like the fictional romantic interest, the whole marathon runner bit—he wasn’t—and the weird identity switch at the end. Despite this parsley, the main points of the tale are true, and I think most GUNS readers would like it.—Connor

President & Vice President?!

Just read articles in April issue by John Conner and John Taffin. Only thing to say is “Connor for President,” and to have a spare, “Taffin for Vice President.”
Chief Joe, Over and OUT!
Joe Lowery
CMSGT USAF RET

Oopsie
Just read Mike Cumpston’s article in the May issue and I must say you were very thorough with it. Thank you so much for taking the time to review our firearm. I do have a couple of corrections for you. Our company’s name is spelled “Lionheart Industries” with no space not “Lion Heart.” Secondly the model is “LH9CN” not “LH9NC.” Other than that, it looks great!
Joshua Whi
Lionheart Industries,
Director of Sales

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Mag Mistake

In his March 2014 article about the new Ruger American Rimfire, Holt Bodinson says the Ruger American Rimfire rotary magazines are not interchangeable with standard BX-1 10/22 magazines.

Of course this is wrong as the American readily accepts standard BX-1 10/22 magazines. Holt is correct in one aspect. He shows the Ruger American magazine next to a clear BX-1 magazine. I’ve found all of the black BX-1 mags fit perfectly but my clear BX-1 mags do not. They are slightly wider.
Gene Sederholm
via e-mail

Holt replies: I stand corrected. The American Rimfire model does accept most standard 10/22 magazines. The problem was I just happened to select a clear 10/22 magazine which did not fit. Contacting Ruger, we received the following:

“The clear 10/22 10-round rotary magazine, introduced in 2004, has historically been somewhat wider than the standard black plastic magazines. Occasionally they are a little snug in some of the narrower 10/22 magazine wells.

“The Ruger American Rimfire magazine well generally runs slightly narrower than the magazine well in 10/22’s, so the odds of coming up with an incompatible magazine/magazine well combination increases when trying to fit a clear magazine into a Ruger American Rimfire. Ruger is working to correct this.—Sturm Ruger”

Two-Gun Man

I just read John’s February article. He doesn’t know this and I am not sure I will tell him. When we shot the Cowboy Action every month, I used a .38 pistol but a .44-40 rifle. John always told me that I should get the same caliber rifle as my pistol.

Anyway, one day John wasn’t shooting (he was recovering from his blood clot issue), and was sitting in a chair back by the car.

I was shooting first on my team and the rifle would not shoot. One of the fellows helped me and I tried shooting again.

This time when it didn’t work I left my shooting spot to really take a look. Lo and behold! What John always worried about had happened. I’d put .38 Special in my .44-40 rifle. No wonder it wouldn’t shoot! So now you, Ray Walters and our readers know my secret…but not John! I couldn’t let him know he was right.

Dot Taffin
via e-mail
Formula Error
In the February issue, Jacob Gottfredson states, “Range = mils x 27.77 ÷ size in inches of the target.” Is this formula correct?
David Schwartz
via e-mail

No, it is wrong! The formula should be: Target size in inches x 27.77 ÷ mils.

Thus, if an elk measures about 30 inches at the brisket, if it’s 2 mils on the reticle, it would be 30 x 27.77 ÷ 2 = 416.6 yards.

I took the formula from a European website. I didn’t even think they might publish an error (inverting inches and mils). I should have caught the error myself. I should never assume something is correct because it is published by people who know what they are doing. Now I’ve made the same error! Thanks for your attention to detail and pointing this out. — Jacob Gottfredson

Welcome Aboard

It’s great to see the talents of Payton Miller adding to an already outstanding staff at GUNS Magazine. He nailed three essential elements where GUNS excels: reader involvement, covering all the bases and editors responding to feedback.

Sadly, the powers at his previous magazine refused to cover all those bases and ignored readers when they complained, which is why GUNS has my complete support. Now, as icing on the cake, I get to read Payton Miller again!
Phil Potter


GUNS Magazine® welcomes letters to the editor. We reserve the right to edit all published letters for clarity and length. Due to the volume of mail, we are unable to individually answer your letters or e-mail. In sending a letter to GUNS Magazine, you agree to provide Publisher’s Development Corp. such copyright as is required for publishing and redistributing the contents of your letter in any format. Send your letters to Crossfire, GUNS Magazine, 12345 World Trade Dr., San Diego, CA 92128; www.gunsmagazine.com; e-mail: ed@nullgunsmagazine.com

M1 Garand

I greatly enjoyed Duke Venturino’s article on the M1 Garand in the February issue. Reading the article, I was reminded of the experiences of my dad, Johnnie A. Qualls, with the 32nd Infantry Division during World War II. There, in desperate combat against the Japanese in New Guinea during late 1942 and early 1943, America’s battle rifle proved its worth. The mud, sand and water of the jungle were a real test for any weapon, but my dad told me many times that the M1 would “sling sand everywhere and come up firing.”

It never failed him, except for once and that was through no fault of the rifle. Elements of the 32nd Division were attempting to take the village of Sanananda on the north coast of New Guinea. In heavy combat, my dad’s M1 suddenly quit functioning. Efforts to clear the weapon were to no avail and he threw it down, intending to pick up a replacement from the wounded. Instead, he helped carry to the rear a soldier wounded by a Nambu machine gun. Somewhat later, another soldier whom my father did not know personally, asked him if he knew what had happened to his M1. My dad said he didn’t, and the soldier told him, “a Japanese bullet went through the gas chamber.” The explanation made sense, though the rifle itself would not be retrieved.

Discharged in 1945, my dad turned in his last M1 at Camp Chaffee, Ark. During processing, he was amazed to see M1 Garands in a warehouse “stacked up like cordwood from floor to ceiling.” He had come through the war safe and uninjured, thanks in part to the superb battle rifle that was the M1 Garand.
Johnnie Qualls
Erie, Colo.

No Hunting?
First I want to thank Mr. Schneider for his service to our country. However, I think he has missed some information regarding hunting (Dec. ’13 Crossfire). I, too, love the opening scene in Last of the Mohicans. I can relate to this as most of my hunting is with flintlock rifles and smoothbores. First of all, “sport hunters” (you know, those of us who buy licenses and obey game laws) have never been responsible for the demise of any species of animal. The destruction of the American Bison was done to eliminate the Plains Indians by our own government.

To put sport hunters in Africa, Alaska, or anywhere else in the same category as poachers is an insult. If it were not for their money, there would be many more extinct animals both here and in other countries and continents. I have read of great damage and personal injury being done in Africa by elephants, as well as other animals. Controlling these problem animals will not result in their extinction, but would lend much needed money to some of these economies.

Hunters are conservationists and they put their money where their mouths are. Poachers are not hunters, they are criminals and thieves. Please don’t put me or other sport hunters in the same category, we have earned and deserve more respect than that.
Thomas Verburg
Lawton, Mich.

No Longer Made
John Barsness’ column “The 9.3×62 Mauser Shoots Softly And Hits Hard” in the January issue lists an HDS cast lead bullet no longer in production. According to Fred H., “…it was intended for the 9.3x72R with a 0.354-inch diameter and 200 grains.” The original load data used a 193-grain lead projectile. We strongly advised against using 0.366-inch diameter bullets in those old guns.

We are starting to field calls for this cast bullet. There may be a bullet mold available from NEI Handtools (915) 772-0259, nei@nullneihandtools.com.

Huntington Die Specialties
P.O. Box 991
Oroville, CA 95965
(530) 534-1210
www.huntingtons.com


GUNS Magazine® welcomes letters to the editor. We reserve the right to edit all published letters for clarity and length. Due to the volume of mail, we are unable to individually answer your letters or e-mail. In sending a letter to GUNS Magazine, you agree to provide Publisher’s Development Corp. such copyright as is required for publishing and redistributing the contents of your letter in any format. Send your letters to Crossfire, GUNS Magazine, 12345 World Trade Dr., San Diego, CA 92128; e-mail: ed@nullgunsmagazine.com

Email Jeff at the address above, or leave a message in the comment section of this page. All comments can take up to 24 hours before they will be posted. We have the right to edit all comments.

All letters above published in The April 2014 Issue Of GUNS Magazine.

Check Back For More Letters To The Editor

What GUNS Readers Are Saying

End Hunting.

I applaud Mr. Ciccone’s opinion on “harvesting.” Originally, humans were classified as “Hunter Gatherers,” I have a hard time understanding how killing a wild animal with a high-powered, scoped rifle at 200 or 300 yards is hunting. My 10-year-old son could do it. I subscribe to several firearm publications and a months total of animals killed for the simple sport of it is staggering. The movie Last of the Mohicans starts with the main characters running through the woods with single-shot muzzleloaders. This is what hunting is supposed to be about. And they were doing it for food, not for the thrill of getting another head to hang on the wall.

We did it to the buffalo, and now we are doing it to the rest of the world, i.e. Africa, Alaska, the western mountain areas. If so-called wild animals are allegedly causing the damage you claim, let it be handled the way is once was, by the locals sustaining the damage. From what I’ve been reading, the only damage being done in Africa is by tusk poachers, and I’ve yet to read about the severe crop damage caused by moose, polar bears or the elk shown page 40 in your October issue. I see the heads being hauled out of the mountains on horseback but where is the rest of the animal? Did the he-men on page 49 really need all the meat from the four dead elk? If these macho “hunters” want to prove their manliness, they should visit a local range and compete against real shooting marksmen and leave the world’s wildlife alone, before they are eventually gone.
Jim Schneider
Kentwood, Mich.
Member, Marine Corps Distinguished Shooters Assn.

Hog Damage

I just read Jerry Cicccone’s letter to the editor. He is rooting for hogs. Let me tell him why we feel like we do about hogs. My neighbor’s cornfield looked great ’til he started to harvest it. The outside rows were perfect, the inside ones, out of sight, were all trampled and the corn ears had been eaten. Then there are the ground nesting birds we used to have. The hogs will eat any nest they come across. How about fawns? During our ongoing dry conditions, fawns have fewer places to hide and are eaten by hogs. Equipment and vehicles suffer from the rough ground hogs tear up. Calves? When you find a head minus the ears and everything else, you know the hogs have found it and eaten everything they could. Calves are worth $600 to $1,500. How many of those to do think it takes to ruin your calf crop? Why do we do anything possible to eradicate them? They cause untold property and money loss. Here in Texas, the experts say we must remove 70 percent of the hogs each year by any means possible or we are loosing ground. It is possible depending on when they start a sow can have 2 or 3 litters a year. If you put all this into prospective, we are in a loosing battle.
Truett Bell
Pattison, Texas

Winner!

I would like to write this letter to the subscribers who enter the Gun of the Month giveaways via postcards. I have sent a postcard every month to the giveaway for years and I finally did win the Gun of the Month April 2013 package! The giveaway is legitimate so just be patient; maybe it’s your turn next month. Keep sending those postcards because it is not a waste of time.

Terry
Illinios via snail mail

Thanks Terry! As a reminder, we never publish the names of winners.—Jeff John

GUNS Magazine® welcomes letters to the editor. We reserve the right to edit all published letters for clarity and length. Due to the volume of mail, we are unable to individually answer your letters or e-mail. In sending a letter to GUNS Magazine, you agree to provide Publisher’s Development Corp. such copyright as is required for publishing and redistributing the contents of your letter in any format. Send your letters to Crossfire, GUNS Magazine, 12345 World Trade Dr., San Diego, CA 92128; e-mail: ed@nullgunsmagazine.com

Email Jeff at the address above, or leave a message in the comment section of this page. All comments can take up to 24 hours before they will be posted. We have the right to edit all comments.

All letters above published in The December 2013 Issue Of GUNS Magazine.


Page Turner:

I’ve never written to any gun magazines I subscribe to, but I couldn’t wait another issue to drop you a quick line.

I don’t know if others have written in the past about this, but no where else do I find the absolutely refreshing practice of actually finishing a story on contiguous pages but here in GUNS Magazine. I can’t describe the frustration I have flipping around in the other mags trying to finish every article, all the while trying to hold my place to get back to begin the next one. Thank you for this simple act of sanity; it alone would cement my future renewals but the quality of content certainly helps.
A happy reader in MA
(Yes, there really are some pro-gun people in this state!)

Last Hunt

John Taffin’s article “The Last Hunt,” was like getting hit on the head with a hammer. I lived every minute of it, being in the twilight of life at 79 years old, I can identify with his feelings. Within the past few years I’ve had to give up shooting the national match course, trap shooting, walking the pheasant fields and my beloved golf. Spinal stenosis and arthritis have taken their toll on my body. I remember my last round of golf, the last time I tried to shoot the national match course unable to get into the prone position and see the sights on my Garand, and my last pheasant hunt. Two Thanksgivings ago was my last 100 bird-trap shoot, just managing to finish the last 25 as my neck pained me so much. I can still shoot my handguns with my grandsons and go on a groundhog hunt if I can shoot from the car. Funny he mentioned the first time he shot a gun. I shot my first gun before kindergarten and before many of the other firsts in life, as have my children. I don’t have his trophies but I have had a lot of fun to look back on.
John Behre
Flemington, N.J.

More .30 Carbine Handguns

OK, I refrained from commenting on this’n before, as I never figgered anyone else cared, nor remembered, but since there’s been such a response, am I the only one who recollects the Universal Enforcer? It was a “cut-down” barreled M1 Carbine action with a pistol grip made from ’64 to ’83 by the Florida firm that started out “recycling” USGI surplus parts and later lost the good reputation they’d earned when they went to aftermarket/cast components. Iver Johnson later resurrected the Model after they acquired Universal. Granted, it barely qualifies as a “handgun” more of a “hand-rifle” or “handful!”
Peter M. Cromwell
Reading, Mich.

Bersa Fan

I subscribe to three or four gun magazines, but reading yours was the first time I have seen an article on the Bersa. I do not know why there are not more articles on this fabulous weapon. Perhaps it is lack of promotion by the company. I have spoken with other shooters who have not even heard of Bersa. I acquired a Bersa Thunder .380 and fell in love. It’s as smooth as the best brandy. Many of the qualities mentioned in the article about the Bersa .40 are true of the .380, which is my favorite weapon, especially for concealed carry. Never a problem.
Tom P.
Phoenix, Ariz.


GUNS Magazine® welcomes letters to the editor. We reserve the right to edit all published letters for clarity and length. Due to the volume of mail, we are unable to individually answer your letters or e-mail. In sending a letter to GUNS Magazine, you agree to provide Publisher’s Development Corp. such copyright as is required for publishing and redistributing the contents of your letter in any format. Send your letters to Crossfire, GUNS Magazine, 12345 World Trade Dr., San Diego, CA 92128; e-mail: ed@nullgunsmagazine.com

Email Jeff at the address above, or leave a message in the comment section of this page. All comments can take up to 24 hours before they will be posted. We have the right to edit all comments.

All letters above published in The November 2013 Issue Of GUNS Magazine.

Check Back For More Letters To The Editor

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