Posted in Handloading | 2 Comments

Big Seven

Big Seven

Handloading the 7mm Remington Magnum.

Any hunter under 40 probably doesn’t realize what excitement the 7mm Remington Magnum created during the 1960s and ’70s. The cartridge was introduced in 1962, along with the “new” Remington Model 700 rifle, essentially a prettying-up of the very plain 722 and 721 rifles. The publicity from Remington (echoed by a bunch of gunwriters) claimed their new 7mm combined all the best features of every all-around big-game cartridge ever. It was as powerful as a .300 Magnum, yet shot as flat as a .270 Winchester and didn’t kick any harder than a .30-06.

Oddly enough, the hype was close to correct, considering the published ballistics of the original factory ammunition, a 150-grain bullet at 3,260 fps and a 175-grain at 3,020 fps. The 7mm Remington Magnum immediately became the hottest-selling big-game round since World War II. My friend and fellow gun writer John Haviland worked in a lumber mill in Missoula, Mont., during the 1970s, and says every worker was issued “a hard hat and a 7mm Remington Magnum.”

Recall all the excitement over the .300 Winchester Short Magnum a decade ago? Multiply that dozens of times and you’ll have some idea of the 7mm Remington Magnum phenomenon. Sales of .270 and .30-06 rifles dipped noticeably, something that had never happened since the war, and the .280 Remington almost died. The “Big Seven” quickly became one of the world’s standard hunting cartridges, chambered by every rifle manufacturer on earth. Close to a dozen other commercial and proprietary 7mm hunting rounds have appeared since 1962, yet some hunters still walk into gun shops and ask for a box of “Seven-em-em shells,” expecting to be handed a box of 7mm Remington Magnum ammunition.

>> Click Here << To Read More February 2012 Handloading

Feb Cover

Order Your Copy Of The February 2012 Issue Today!

Get More Handloading

Share |
  1. bill gardner says:

    I have a H&R ultra mannlicher carbine 18″ barrel in 7mm mag.Any suggestions on a powder to try with 140&160gr bullets?

    • brent young says:

      try the powder made by Hodgdon called H-varget. i use this for my .270 and 30-06. i have been very impressed with it.

Leave a Reply

(Spamcheck Enabled)